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Legacy Code follows Era and her husband Dritan as they are transferred to the safest ship in the fleet to have a child. The ability to have a child born without Defect is a precious and valuable commodity and Era hopes that her unborn child will be healthy. But when the hull is breached an investigation is launched that uncovers treason and traitors.

Science Fiction stories about people living on space ships that are traveling and have population control are my weak point. I love those kinds of stories, so I have high expectations. Unfortunately, Legacy Code didn’t meet those expectations.

Legacy Code falters in its world building. The world building is almost nonexistent, so the story built within this world is confusing and a weak. The little world building that is present is unsatisfying because it’s so hurried. This type of story needs to be firmly grounded in the world it takes place in so the reader is fully immersed in the conflicts the characters find themselves in and the decisions they make.

Along with the lack of world building, there was also a lack of smooth character development. The main character’s jump from model citizen to traitor is quick and has no foreshadowing. There isn’t a moment in the beginning of the novel that hints at Era’s willingness to abandon everything to fight for the truth.

The lack of smooth character development is due in fact to the novels very strong anti-abortion stance. Era decides to risk everything for a chance to save her unborn child. At one point in the book, the anti-abortion stance is so heavily advocated it feels as if you’re listening to one of those people who stand in front of women’s health clinics. If you’re strongly pro-choice than this book may not be for you.

 

Overall, Legacy Code has a strong premise but falters in its lack of world building and character development.

 

 

 

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